Ed Sheeran, Drake and Justin Bieber: What were they doing 10 years ago?


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After spending 79 weeks at number 1, it’s no wonder Ed Sheeran’s been named the UK’s artist of the decade.He’s spent more time at the top of the album and singles charts than anyone else in the last 10 years, according to The Official Charts Company.But it’s fair to say life’s changed – just a little bit – for him and some of the others named as the biggest acts of the 2010s.

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Back at the start of the decade, One Direction had only just formed, Harry and Meghan hadn’t even met, and an 18-year-old Ed Sheeran was still in music college.He’d started doing smaller gigs, was getting a following on YouTube and had self-released his own EPs.Long before headlining Glastonbury, he played the much smaller BBC Introducing stage at the festival… and even performed at London’s St Pancras train station.Soon he was asked to support Example on his UK tour and started doing gigs at people’s houses to try to build his following. And let’s just call the rest history.He’s now sold more than 150 million records worldwide and according to Heat Magazine, he’s the UK’s richest celebrity under 30… said to be worth £160m.Then there are the eight number one singles, four chart-topping albums and 42 tracks in the Top 40… not to mention the time he broke the chart with 16 songs in the Top 20.Not bad for a teenager from Suffolk who just loved folk music, rap and playing guitar.Justin Bieber

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If you remember Twitter in 2010, you’ll remember how Justin Bieber was trending almost every single day. No real reason, just because… well, who wouldn’t want to tweet about those cheeks? At the time, it was reported the singer accounted for 3% of all traffic on the site.It was the year the singer broke through with his first big single after being spotted by a music manager on YouTube. Baby got to number three in the UK and its video became the most viewed and most disliked ever on YouTube.It was also the year the 15-year-old started dating Selena Gomez.But it was also the year his voice started breaking. He admitted at the time that he was struggling to hit some of the notes on Baby.

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Media captionThe singer was interviewed by the BBC in 2012
The next few years saw the singer get in a lot of trouble… reckless driving, vandalism, driving under the influence.But he also became one of the world’s best-selling artists. He’s now sold an estimated 150 million records and in 2017 became only the second person to reach 100 million followers on Twitter, after Katy Perry. He’s been listed three times by Forbes magazine as one of the world’s top ten most powerful celebrities and in 2016 became the first artist to reach 10 billion total video views on Vevo.It was also the decade the singer settled down, marrying Hailey Baldwin.Earlier this year, he wrote on Instagram about how he became “the most hated person in the world” thanks to a string of “bad decisions” in his 20s, including heavy drug use and abusing his relationships.Drake

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At the start of the decade – it was a pretty big deal when Drake had his face plastered on the side of a plane as part of an airline publicity campaign.By the end of 2019 though, the rapper’s got his very own £140m Boeing 767.Around 10 years ago, Drake was busy promoting club nights. But safe to say he hasn’t had to hand out many fliers lately.By 2010, he was already known for his part in Canadian teen drama Degrassi: The Next Generation. He’d also started releasing his own mixtapes.But this was the year of his debut studio album which went to number one in the US album chart – with nearly half a million sales in the first week alone.To mark the album launch, 25,000 fans gathered at New York City’s South Street Seaport for a free concert, which was later called off by police because of overcrowding.Fast forward to 2016, and the release of One Dance. It spent a whopping 15 weeks in a row at number one in the UK – the joint longest for any track at the top of the chart,Around the world he’s now sold 170 million records, won 4 Grammy’s, founded his own OVO Sound record label and become Top Boy’s executive producer.It’s also the decade Drake made YOLO a thing, became a dad… and cursed just a few sporting events. Jess Glynne

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At the start of the decade, a 20-year-old Jess Glynne was finishing music college in East London.It’s where she met her future collaborators, songwriter Jin Jin and producer Bless Beats.In the early days of Twitter, she could be found fan-girling Alicia Keys and shouting out for spare Bestival tickets – years before performing there herself.2010 was the year she had what she called her “first ever sing song gig” in central London.Soon, she was signed by Black Butter Records. By day, she was working in brand management for a drinks company but she quit in 2013 when her big break came – signing with Atlantic Records.Fast forward to the end of 2019 and the singer’s now got 400,000 Twitter followers.Not to mention the seven UK number one singles, two chart-topping albums and the 79 weeks her tracks have spent in the Top 10.She’s also got the record for most the most number one singles by a British female solo artist.

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Harvey Weinstein 'reaches tentative $25m deal with accusers'


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Media captionWeinstein attended a court hearing on Wednesday using a walking frame
Film mogul Harvey Weinstein has reached a tentative $25m (£19m) settlement with dozens of women who have accused him of sexual misconduct, lawyers have said.Some 30 actresses and ex-employees would share the payout in the deal.However, it still needs signing off by all parties, Mr Weinstein’s lawyers have not commented and some say the deal will punish those holding out. Mr Weinstein faces a separate criminal trial next month on rape and sexual assault charges, which he denies.The Hollywood producer could face life in jail if convicted.What is in the agreement?It is important to stress it is still not final. Details of the deal were initially carried in the New York Times, but lawyers have confirmed most of them with other US media outlets.The newspaper said the agreement had obtained preliminary approval from most of the parties involved.The main elements appear to be:
The plaintiffs in the case would share in the payout, as could others who join the suit
It is a global deal that would end almost all related civil lawsuits against Mr Weinstein and his previous employer
Mr Weinstein would not pay personally, the sum would come from insurance firms representing the Weinstein Company
Mr Weinstein would not admit wrongdoing
Court approval would be required
The $25m is part of a larger $47m package intended to close the Weinstein Company’s liabilities, including legal fees
Lawyers for Mr Weinstein and The Weinstein Company contacted by the New York Times and other media outlets have declined to comment.A group lawsuit had been brought by dozens of women who accuse Mr Weinstein of sexual harassment and abuse, though high-profile figures who have also made allegations, such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie, are not part of the action.What has the reaction been?It has certainly been mixed.Genie Harrison, a lawyer for one of the plaintiffs, told the New York Times: “I don’t think there’s a markedly better deal to be made.”She said other alleged victims who hold out could end up with nothing, and that they should “come forward and be able to get the best level of compensation we were able to get”.One plaintiff backing the deal, Louisette Geiss, told Associated Press (AP) news agency: “This settlement will ensure that all survivors have the chance for recovery and can move forward without Harvey’s damaging lock on their careers.”

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Media captionFormer assistants Rowena Chiu and Zelda Perkins speak about Weinstein
But Zoe Brock, an actor and model involved in the case, told the BBC: “I think the settlement is a joke and it signifies an absolutely broken system. I’m devastated by it, I’m appalled by it.”Some lawyers for plaintiffs were also unhappy with the terms.Douglas Wigdor told the BBC: “We reject the notion that this was the best settlement that could have been achieved.”What we learned from the Weinstein documentary UntouchableHe said it was “outrageous that the proposed settlement will seek to bind non-participating members by providing a release to the insurance companies and the directors of the Weinstein Company itself”.Anti-sexual harassment campaign group Time’s Up tweeted: “If this is the best the survivors could get, the system is broken.”What will Mr Weinstein face trial for?Mr Weinstein’s criminal trial is set to begin on 6 January in Manhattan.He is accused of raping a woman in a hotel room in the New York borough in 2013, and of performing a forcible sex act on a second woman in 2006.He denies the charges.He also pleaded not guilty in August to two additional charges of predatory sexual assault over an alleged rape in 1993, although these cannot be prosecuted because of time limits.The 67-year-old has denied sexual misconduct allegations by more than 70 women.The accusations came after the New York Times published a story in October 2017 detailing decades of allegations. Actresses Rose McGowan and Ashley Judd were among the women who came forward.On Wednesday, Mr Weinstein’s bail sum was raised from $1m to $5m for the alleged mishandling of an electronic ankle monitor.He attended the court hearing in New York using a walking frame. His lawyers said he was undergoing surgery on Thursday for injuries suffered in a car accident in August.



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Presidents Cup: Internationals take 4-1 lead over Tiger Woods' United States




US captain Woods says his side will “regroup” and be “ready to go” on day twoThe International team took a 4-1 lead over the United States after the opening-day fourballs in the Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne in Australia.US playing captain Tiger Woods and Justin Thomas secured their side’s only point as they beat Marc Leishman and Joaquin Niemann 4&3.Louis Oosthuizen and Abraham Ancer beat long-hitting US pair Dustin Johnson and Gary Woodland by the same score.”This is an unbelievable start,” said International captain Ernie Els.”We haven’t had a start like this for many years. “It’s really nice to have some points on the board. There were a lot of tight matches and a lot of crucial putts, and great golf shots.”The win by Woods and Thomas over Australian Leishman and Chile debutant Niemann put the first point on the board but it was downhill from there for the US side.South Africa’s Oosthuizen and Mexico’s Abraham Ancer, who was also making his debut, made it 1-1 before home favourite Adam Scott and South Korea’s An Byeong-hun put the Internationals ahead with a 2&1 win over Bryson DeChambeau and Tony Finau.Canada’s Adam Hadwin and South Korean Im Sung-jae extended the lead when they earned a hard-fought 1-up victory against Xander Schauffele and Patrick Cantlay.Patrick Reed, who was heckled by the crowd around the first tee following the controversy of his rule break at the Hero World Challenge last Friday, missed a long putt on the 18th as he and Webb Simpson lost to Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama and CT Pan of Chinese Taipei.”This is a long four days. I mean, we have to go earn this cup,” said Woods.”Just because we lost the session doesn’t mean the cup’s over. There’s a long way to go, a lot of points available. “The guys will regroup and we’ll come out tomorrow ready to go.”



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General election 2019: Voters head to polls across the UK


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The UK is going to the polls for the country’s third general election in less than five years. The contest, the first to be held in December in nearly 100 years, follows those in 2015 and 2017. Polling stations in 650 constituencies across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland opened at 07:00 GMT.After the polls close at 22:00 GMT, counting will begin straight away. Most results are due to be announced in the early hours of Friday morning.A total of 650 MPs will be chosen under the first-past-the-post system used for general elections, in which the candidate who secures the most votes in each individual constituency is elected. In 2017, Newcastle Central was the first constituency to declare, announcing its result about an hour after polls closed. Elections in the UK traditionally take place every four or five years. But, in October, MPs voted for the second snap poll in as many years. It is the first winter election since 1974 and the first to take place in December since 1923.Anyone aged 18 or over is eligible to vote, as long as they are a British citizen or qualifying citizen of the Commonwealth or Republic of Ireland and have registered to vote. Registration closed on 26 November.

Follow election night on the BBC
Watch the election night special with Huw Edwards from 21:55 GMTon BBC One, the BBC News Channel, iPlayer

As polls close at 22:00, the BBC will publish an exit poll across all its platforms, including @bbcbreaking and @bbcpolitics

The BBC News website and app will bring you live coverage and the latest analysis throughout the night
We will feature results for every constituency as they come in with a postcode search, map and scoreboards

Follow @bbcelection for every constituency result

From 21:45 GMT, Jim Naughtie and Emma Barnett will host live election night coverage on BBC Radio 4, with BBC Radio 5 live joining for a simulcast from midnight

Details about where to vote can be found on the Electoral Commission website and are also listed on polling cards sent to households. People do not need a polling card to be able to vote but will need to give their name and address at their local polling station. People can only vote for one candidate or their ballot paper will not be counted. Ahead of the poll, the elections watchdog has reminded voters that taking selfies and other photos inside polling stations is not permitted and may be a breach of the law.Many people have already put a cross next to the name of their favoured candidate by voting by post – more than seven million people used a postal vote two years ago. Those who applied for a postal vote but have yet to return it to their Electoral Office must do so by 22:00. Alternatively, they can hand it into their local polling station by the close of polls.According to the BBC’s weather forecast, Thursday will be a wet day in many parts of the country, with highs of five degrees Celsius in Edinburgh, nine in Cardiff, seven in Belfast and eight in London.

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Voting will take place in schools, churches, town halls and more unusual locations, including launderettes



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The papers: Bellamy tributes and Myanmar 'genocide denial'


Political coverage and commentary takes up most of the front pages. The BBC, along with other broadcasters, is not allowed to report details of campaigning while the polls are open.Away from the election, The Times considers what it calls the extraordinary transition of the Myanmar leader and Nobel Peace Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, following her appearance at the International Court of Justice defending her country’s treatment of the Rohingya Muslims.It says she’s gone from dissident voice, political prisoner and opposition politician to the genocide-denying champion of an almost friendless government. It suggests that the Nobel Peace Prize awards committee should think carefully about whether she still deserves the honour.

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Nobel Peace Prize-winner Aung San Suu Kyi denied accusations of genocide

The Daily Telegraph says that, often lauded for her principled stance against the military, Miss Suu Kyi has been criticised for now defending their actions. For the Financial Times, her journey from the Nobel Peace Prize podium in Oslo to the UN court in The Hague is a symbol of her alienation from global admirers who once saw her as a human rights icon.There’s sharp criticism of a new law passed in India yesterday that will fast-track citizenship claims for immigrants from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan – but not if they are Muslim.The Financial Times warns that the law threatens the history of Indian secularism. It is, the paper says, a milestone in the campaign by the prime minister, Narendra Modi, to reshape India into an overtly Hindu nation.Prince Andrew accuser’s fearsSeveral papers report claims by Virginia Giuffre – who accuses the convicted sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, of ordering her to have sex with Prince Andrew – that “too many evil people” want to silence her.The Daily Mail says a chilling Twitter post yesterday hinted that she now fears for her safety following her Panorama interview earlier this month. According to the Daily Express, she said she was in no way suicidal, and added: “If something happens to me, don’t let it go”. The prince has “categorically” denied any sexual contact with Ms Giuffre.Many of the papers carry pictures of the disgraced Hollywood producer, Harvey Weinstein, shuffling into court in New York yesterday, looking a shadow of his former self. The Daily Mail says he looked frail as he used a walking frame, clearly needing more support than the stick he used at earlier hearings.

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Broadcaster and botanist David Bellamy died at the age of 86

Finally, there are many affectionate tributes to the botanist and television presenter, David Bellamy, who has died at the age of 86. The Sun says he was larger than life and inspired millions with his love of nature. The Daily Mail describes him as the jolly green giant of the small screen. It says children adored him because he belonged to their world – a world of creepy crawlies, mud baths and the great outdoors.

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White Island volcano: NZ police plan to recover bodies on Friday


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The volcano erupted on Monday when dozens of tourists were on the island

New Zealand police have said they plan to recover the bodies left on White Island after a volcanic eruption on Friday morning .This is despite the continued risk of another eruption which has been in place since the initial explosion on Monday.Earlier, police said they were considering a “high-speed recovery”. At least eight people are still thought to be on White Island, though police say there all presumed dead. Eight more people are confirmed dead and 20 are in intensive care with severe burns.GeoNet, New Zealand’s geological hazard information site, said on Thursday there was a 50-60% chance of another eruption occurring within the next 24 hours.But families are growing increasingly “desperate” for the bodies to be recovered. New Zealand volcano: What we know of the victimsA ‘trade off’In a press conference earlier on Thursday, Deputy Police Commissioner Mike Clement said police were considering several options for the risky endeavour.A normal recovery operation would see police spending enough time at the scene to collect the evidence needed to ensure the bodies were all properly identified.

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Mr Clement said the option was not without its trade offs

A fast mission would mean recovering the remains quicker but with a “trade off”.”If you are the next of kin and we don’t get an identification as a consequence of taking that process, they are not going to be happy and I would understand that,” Mr Clement said.There are also concerns that the air on the island is dangerous to breathe. Authorities are trying to measure toxic gas levels with the help of drones sent over the island. It’s not clear if the recovery planned for Friday will be a normal or a fast mission.
White Island volcano: Why skin is being imported
Volcano tourism in the spotlight after New Zealand
“We are now living with a growing sense of desperation to bring home those that we know are there and those we love,” Whakatane Mayor Judy Turner told reporters. “The frustration of those families most affected is completely understandable.”The volcano, also known as Whakaari, erupted on Monday when at least 47 visitors from around the world were on the crater.Many of the survivors are still in intensive care with severe burns.An estimated 1.2m sq cm of replacement skin will be needed for the patients, according to Dr Peter Watson, chief medical officer at New Zealand’s National Burns Unit.Police have said the injuries to so some were so severe that they were unable to identify themselves.White Island is a popular tourist destination off the northern coast of North Island and there were day tours and scenic flights available.



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Devon couple's 48-year-old boiler finally packs up


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Rob Braddick

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Graham Braddick joked he was upset because he thought his boiler came with a 50-year guarantee

An elderly couple are getting rid of the boiler they have had for almost 50 years after it finally stopped working.Graham Braddick and his wife Dorothy – both 87 – bought the boiler for £200 in 1971 when they moved into their house.The couple, from Northam in Devon, said they have “never had any problems with it”.”I thought it came with a 50-year guarantee but I cannot find the paperwork,” Mr Braddick joked. “That would have been lovely.”

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Rob Braddick

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The boiler was installed in the home of Mr and Mrs Braddick in 1971

The Hotspur oil-fired boiler, made by Harford-Unical Limited, has been serviced by the same man every year since they bought it.”He used to come regularly but the last time he visited he simply said he could not do it anymore,” Mr Braddick said.”It has been reliable – it hasn’t gone wrong before. But now he can’t get the bits he needs to fix it because it’s so old, you see.”The couple are now in the process of getting another boiler and said they were “not sure where the new one was made”.You may also like:

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Rob Braddick

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“The only old appliances left in the house are us,” Mr Braddick said

“This one was made in England – that’s quite rare now,” Mr Braddick said.”I even remember the man who came here to fit it and he was called Mr Grant. He put it all in for us when we bought the house.”We had to keep warm with the boiler in those days. I don’t know what we would have done without it.”Mr Braddick joked that he and his wife, who celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary in March, were now the “only old appliances left in the house”.



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Anger as protesters barred from UN climate talks


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Protestors were forced outside by UN security staff

Environmentalists and observers have been barred from UN climate talks in Madrid after a protest inside the conference. Around 200 climate campaigners were ejected after staging a sit in, preventing access to one of the negotiating halls. Protesters said they were “pushed, bullied and touched without consent.”In the wake of the disruption all other observers were then barred from the talks. Observers play an important role in the talks, representing civil society. They are allowed to sit in on negotiations and have access to negotiators on condition that they do not reveal the contents of those discussions. There was no comment from the UN when asked for an explanation of what had happened. Just hours after Greta Thunberg had delivered a powerful speech to COP25, young campaigners staged a noisy demonstration in front of the main halls where the UN secretary general was due to update the conference on the progress of the talks. They were expressing a rising sense of disappointment with the slow progress of the conference, which is in marked contrast to the urgency of scientists and the clamour for action from school strikers.

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Greenpeace executive director Jennifer Morgan has attended 25 COPs and this is the first time she has been barred from entry

As the group banged pots and pans and chanted slogans, UN security staff intervened to move the protestors outside “abruptly and roughly,” from the building, protesters said.Julius Mbatia, 25, a climate youth leader in Africa who works with Christian Aid said: “It’s displeasing that young people here to peacefully make the case for strong action on climate change, are being kettled and kicked out of the summit so that the UN climate process can conclude an outcome that will seemingly be weak and doesn’t protect their future.”Around 200 had their badges removed, preventing them from returning to the talks.

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The protest took place a few hours after Greta Thunberg had spoken to the conference

The executive director of Greenpeace International, Jennifer Morgan, was one of those who went outside in solidarity with the protestors. Ms Morgan was also barred from entry when she tried to return, despite playing no part in the protest.Earlier in the day, Ms Morgan had sat on a panel with Greta Thunberg – part of an effort by the UN to include the voices of young people around the world.”I call on the UN secretary general to intervene here to make sure that youth and citizens around the world can engage and have their voices heard in these negotiations – it’s absolutely imperative that he get involved,” Ms Thunberg said.Discontent with the way the talks have been going has been rising in recent days with the sense that major emitting countries are doing all they can to block progress.

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Protestors were making noise and chanting at the talks

The UN on Wednesday released more details about the scale of the challenge. All countries who signed the Paris agreement are due to put new climate pledges on the table by the end of next year. So far, 84 countries have promised to enhance their national plans by then. Some 73 have said they will set a long-term target of net zero by the middle of the century.But many in attendance at the meeting believe that this is far short of where the world needs to be to avoid dangerous levels of warming. “Frankly, I’m tired of hearing major emitters excuse inaction in cutting their own emissions on the basis they are ‘just a fraction’ of the world’s total,” said the prime minister of Fiji, Frank Bainimarama.”The truth is, in a family of nearly 200 nations, collective efforts are key. We all must take responsibility for ourselves, and we all must play our part to achieve net zero. As I like to say, we’re all in the same canoe. But currently, that canoe is taking on water with nearly 200 holes — and there are too few of us trying to patch them,” Mr Bainimarama said.There are also worries that the final statement of ambition from this meeting may be watered down, with all the major decisions kicked down the road towards the key meeting in Glasgow at the end of next year. Follow Matt on Twitter:@mattmcgrathbbc.



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White Island volcano: Death toll rises to eight, police say


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The White Island volcano, also known as Whakaari, erupted on Monday

Two people who were being treated in hospital after the eruption of New Zealand’s White Island volcano have died, bringing the official number of victims to eight, police say.Nine people are still officially missing, presumed dead, and efforts to retrieve bodies from the island were put on hold on Wednesday amid signs of increased seismic activity.Another 20 people are in intensive care with severe burns.Five have been moved to Australia.Australian brothers Matthew Hollander, 13, and Berend Hollander, 16, have died in hospital, their school confirmed on Thursday. The volcano, also known as Whakaari, erupted on Monday when dozens of tourists were on the island. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said several more Australians were missing and presumed dead, adding on Thursday: “In the days ahead, there will be worse news.”Speaking to reporters on Wednesday, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said: “I’ve spoken to many of those involved in the operation and they are very, very eager to get back there, they want to bring people’s loved ones home”.

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Mother and daughter Julie and Jessica Richards, aged 47 and 20, are among the dead

What condition are the injured in?White Island is a popular tourist destination with frequent day tours and scenic flights available. At least 47 visitors from around the world were on the volcano crater at the time of two explosions in quick succession.White Island volcano: Why skin is being importedPolice Minister Stuart Nash explained the injuries to the survivors were so severe that some of them were unable to identify themselves.”There are a number of people in hospital who cannot communicate, they have significant burns not only to skin but internal organs,” he told Radio New Zealand.”We wish them the best but we’re not out of the woods yet, of that there’s no doubt.”

Dr Peter Watson, chief medical officer at New Zealand’s National Burns Unit, said an estimated 1.2m sq cm of replacement skin would be needed for the patients. An order has been placed from the US.Several patients would be transferred to Australia by the Australian Defence Force using an intensive-care acceptable aircraft, Dr Watson said.

Where does donor skin come from?Analysis by James Gallagher, BBC health and science correspondentDonated skin is vital for helping to save the life of a major burns patient. Skin is our largest organ and its main job is keeping dangerous viruses and bacteria out.The damage caused by severe burns leaves patients at very high risk of infection. Donor skin is a short-term fix.It comes from dead organ donors – in the same way as hearts, kidneys and corneas – and can be banked for several years.The donor skin aids healing, cuts the risk of infection and can reduce pain. The immune system is so weak after such an injury that rejection is not an issue. A single major burns patient needs a lot of donor skin. New Zealand is treating many at the same time and has needed to turn to other countries for help.

What do we know about the victims?New Zealand’s chief coroner on Wednesday declared the eruption a “mass fatality incident”.Officials said they were working with disaster specialists and forensic experts to identify the victims so their bodies could be returned to their families.

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Reuters

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There have been many tributes for the victims in the nearby port town

New Zealand police have now listed nine people as officially missing – though they say this is a partial list as they have not been able to speak to all the next of kin.These are:
Hayden Inman (New Zealand)
Tipene Maangi (New Zealand)
Julie Richards (Australia)
Jessica Richards (Australia)
Gavin Dallow (Australia)
Zoe Hosking (Australia)
Richard Elzer (Australia)
Karla Matthews (Australia)
Krystal Browitt (Australia)
At least seven people on the list are believed to be dead or presumed dead, based on relatives talking to media.The parents of the Hollander brothers, Martin and Barbara Hollander, are not on the list but remain missing.Tour guide Hayden Inman was identified as among the dead by his brother on Facebook.Julie Richards and her daughter Jessica from Brisbane, Australia, were identified as victims by a family spokesperson.In pictures: White Island eruptionAdelaide father Gavin Dallow has been named as dead, with his stepdaughter Zoe Hosking presumed dead, according to media reports. Australian tourist Jason Griffiths, who was travelling with Karla Matthews and Richard Elzer, died in hospital on Wednesday. According to a statement released by their friends, both Karla and Richard are presumed dead.There is also a definitive list of all victims who are in hospital but police say they cannot release this for privacy reasons.

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Media captionParamedic Russell Clark: “Everything was blanketed in ash”
Why has the recovery been delayed?On Wednesday morning, geological agency GeoNet said “the level of volcanic tremor has significantly increased at the island”.Scientists view tremors, which result from a release of energy under the Earth’s surface, as one sign of a possible eruption.In a later update, the agency said volcanic tremor, known as seismic activity, was now at the highest level seen since 2016.”The level of volcanic tremor continues to rise and there is medium likelihood of future eruptive activity in the next 24 hours,” the agency said.

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Michael Schade

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A clip posted on Twitter showed an ash-covered helicopter on the island as the eruption took place

At a news conference on Wednesday, volcanologist Graham Leonard said seismic activity on White Island was escalating. “Yesterday there was a high risk of an eruption,” Mr Leonard said. “Today there is an even higher risk of an eruption. And the parameters are worsening at the moment.”Police said the latest seismology update meant recovery teams had no choice but to wait, but they were on constant standby to return to the island as soon as possible.Police Minister Nash said there were also poisonous gases coming from the volcanic vent and that the island was blanketed in a thick layer of acidic ash.With measuring equipment on the island still intact, GeoNet can give regular updates on the situation, allowing police to assess the risk of sending recovery teams. Reconnaissance flights have shown no signs of life on the island and officials believe there are no survivors among the missing.Police said a drone conducted four fly-overs of the island on Wednesday, and analysis of that footage was ongoing.Are you in the area? If it’s safe to share your experiences then please email haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways:
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What are beauty pageants really like for black women?


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Zozibini Tunzi won Miss Universe on Sunday, becoming the first to do so with short natural hair

When Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa was crowned Miss Universe on Sunday, it marked the first time black women have simultaneously held the top titles of four major beauty pageants.Media outlets jumped on the news and many on social media celebrated.Some said that along with Ms Tunzi, Cheslie Kryst (Miss USA), Kaliegh Garris (Miss Teen USA) and Nia Franklin (Miss America), she represents a new age for beauty pageants, one of diversity and inclusion. Ms Tunzi has been especially praised, with her dark black skin and short, natural hair.Even Miss USA 2016 Deshauna Barber shared a video on Instagram of her reaction the moment Ms Tunzi won. “Miss Universe looks like me!” she shouted to the camera over and over.But Ms Barber also told the BBC that black women still faced discrimination when competing, and that representation could be the first step towards fixing it.”If you come from a group that’s rarely under-represented, it’s hard to understand what representation means,” she said.’I was afraid to wear my hair curly’Gabriela Taveras – the first black woman to win Miss Massachusetts – said one issue was that black women often didn’t fit the traditional pageant definitions of beauty.”There’s this idea of what beautiful is,” she said. “And in the past that ideal was white women.”

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Ms Taveras said her hair “didn’t fit the European standard of beauty”

Ms Taveras was crowned in 2018 and went on to compete in Miss America, making the top five.One of the most challenging decisions she had to make was a seemingly small one – how to wear her hair.”I remember the war of straight vs curly,” she said, “It was so bad.””I was afraid to wear my hair curly because I knew it didn’t fit the European standard of beauty.”
Miss Universe 2019: ‘May every little girl see their faces reflected in mine’
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She decided to compete with her natural curly hair. When young girls told her they were “so excited Miss Massachusetts looked like them” she said she knew it was the right move.”I knew that I looked and felt like myself,” she said. “I knew I was being myself and I wasn’t pretending to be anyone else.”Ms Barber said she was also afraid to wear her natural hair. Thinking it would hurt her chances, she didn’t wear it while competing.But for her last walk as Miss USA, she wore her natural hair as a tribute to her late mother. “She had been asking me all my years of pageants to wear my afro, but I was way too afraid.”

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Ms Barber wore her natural hair on her last walk as Miss USA in 2017

Ms Barber says she’s also faced colourism – or discrimination based on skin shade – while competing. She has a dark complexion and said some people didn’t find her skin colour to be beautiful.’Nobody was mixing up the blondes'”My year was one of the largest groups of women of colour competing in Miss America,” Ms Taveras said. “When you consider the history, just to be in that position is amazing.”But that led to it’s own challenges. Ms Taveras said people would often mix up the contestants who were black.
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“One time I was behind the stage waiting to be called out, and someone came up to me and said: ‘Louisiana, go, you’re being called’, to the point that they didn’t believe me at first when I said I wasn’t her,” she said. The exchange went back and forth several times before the person gave up.People would even mix up black contestants when they had very different skin shades. But, she noted, “nobody was mixing up the blondes”.’They’ve never picked a girl like you’She also said there’s added pressure as a black woman, trying to tread that line between representing yourself and feeling like you also represent an entire group.”Your margin for error is very small,” she said. “There’s this standard where we can’t confirm the biases or the unconscious biases people have of us.”

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Ms Taveras said her Miss America year in 2018 was one of the largest groups of women of colour competing

Even when black women win pageants, Ms Taveras said they didn’t always get the credit they deserved.She said people would make comments that she had only won her title because she was black.”They used my race as a weapon against me.”Ms Barber experienced similar criticism, saying it was offensive because it implied “we couldn’t succeed by our own abilities or because we’re the most qualified”.When Ms Taveras was competing to be the first black Miss Massachusetts in the title’s history, even her family had doubts.”I used to have family members say: ‘When are you going to give up? They’ve never picked a girl like you.'”And then there were directly racist remarks, especially from people online. Both women said words like “monkey” were used to criticise their appearance.

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The newly-crowned Ms Tunzi said she grew up in world where women who looked like her weren’t considered beautiful

‘Pageantry is shifting’Despite the challenges black women still face in pageants, both women are excited about the current black titleholders and are hopeful for the future.”We’re in an era where pageantry is shifting, and that’s making a lot of people uncomfortable, but it’s making people like me celebrate,” Ms Barber said.It’s not just about black women and pageantry, she said, but rather every group that was under-represented.”I look forward to seeing a plus-size Miss Universe or a Miss Universe wearing a hijab.”Ms Taveras agrees, and hopes the shift will help women outside the pageant world as well.”All day I hear teenagers and women talk about how they’re fat or they don’t like their face or their nose,” she said. “And I hope this diversity inspires people.”

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Media captionWomen talk about why they love their natural hair



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