Victoria Derbyshire Show to come off air as part of BBC cuts


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The BBC2 show presented by Victoria Derbyshire has landed countless exclusive interviews

The BBC’s award-winning Victoria Derbyshire Show is coming off air, the broadcaster’s media editor has learned.Amol Rajan said the cost of running the news and current affairs programme on a linear channel “when savings are needed” had been “deemed too high”.In 2016 it was announced BBC News would need to find £80m of cuts over four years.The broadcaster is due to make an announcement about its news operation next week.It comes two days after Tony Hall announced his resignation as the BBC’s director general.Numerous media personalities responded with shock to the news of the programme coming off air, praising the programme’s award-winning journalism. Louisa Compton, who edited the Victoria Derbyshire Show when it was first launched, said the decision was “madness” – while ITV’s Piers Morgan said it was a “very strange” call.Labour’s shadow culture secretary, Tracy Brabin, tweeted that the programme’s “rigorous campaigning and commitment to public having their say made it pretty unique in daytime TV”.She said she would be looking into why the show was being taken off air. Amol Rajan said he understands BBC News is “committed” to the presenter and the journalism of the show.The BBC has declined to comment.

Aired at 10:00 on BBC2 and the BBC News Channel every weekday, the show focuses on original stories, audience debates and exclusive interviews as well as breaking news.It was launched in April 2015.In 2017 the show won a Bafta for its news coverage of footballers’ abuse, while Derbyshire herself has won and been nominated for several awards for presenting the show. Other exclusive stories the show has uncovered include the number of deaths linked to Xanax and the way how family courts treat victims of domestic violence.

When Victoria Derbyshire proposed a TV version of her Radio 5 Live Show to former BBC News boss James Harding, he gave her the green light within days. BBC News has a big problem in connecting with some licence fee payers away from big cities and from poorer backgrounds – or, in the jargon, “underserved audiences”. For Harding and BBC News, Derbyshire – and the show’s first editor, Louisa Compton (now at Channel 4) – were the solution to a big problem.It worked – online.Derbyshire’s programme was highly effective in reaching those people, through original journalism, investigations and scoops of a kind that the BBC generally struggles to do. But on linear TV channels it failed to garner a sufficiently big audience to justify its cost.First it was chopped from two hours to one. Now it is gone.BBC News is looking to make big savings and re-organise its structure so that digital journalism is prioritised.



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Wuhan: Virus-hit Chinese city to shut public transport


Wuhan, a Chinese city of nearly nine million people, is to temporarily shut public transport amid a virus outbreak.Those living in the city have been told not to leave, and the airport and train stations will be closed to outgoing passengers.Bus, subway, ferry, and long-distance transport networks will be suspended from 1000 local time on 23 January. The new virus has spread from Wuhan to several Chinese provinces, the US, Thailand and South Korea.The virus, known as 2019-nCoV, is understood to be a new strain of coronavirus not previously been identified in humans.This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version.You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts.



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Premiership to release report into Saracens' salary cap breaches




Saracens have won back-to-back Premiership titles but will compete in the Championship in 2020-21Premiership Rugby will release the report into Saracens’ breaches of the league’s salary cap.The move comes after the defending champions said they were “keen” for the report to be published in full.The north London club will be relegated to the Championship at the end of the season for persistently breaking the Premiership’s regulations.Sarries had already been deducted 35 points and fined £5.4m in November for the three previous seasons’ spending.In a statement published on the club website, Saracens chairman Neil Golding said the release of the report will “provide much needed context and clarity” to the situation.Sarries, winners of four of the past five Premiership titles and three of the past four European Champions Cups, accepted relegation after being asked to prove they complied with the £7m cap for the 2019-20 campaign.Golding, who took over from Nigel Wray as Saracens chairman earlier this month, said another audit of the club would have involved a “long period of more financial and emotional strain”, which was “not a viable option”.”We agreed with PRL on relegation in the hope that we could draw a line under the mistakes made by Saracens with respect to compliance with the regulations and concentrate on putting new robust procedures in place,” he added.”We know our path will not be a smooth one in the short term. We must face that challenge together; be resilient, united and open in order to move forward.”

Saracens will ‘come back stronger’ – Farrell

On Tuesday, Premiership Rugby chief executive Darren Childs called on Saracens to “take ownership” of the process which led to their unprecedented punishment, and the league’s governing body have now begun preparations to release the decision document.”Premiership Rugby welcomes Saracens’ decision to withdraw its previous objection to publication of Lord Dyson’s decision,” a spokesperson said.”These objections were stated in the strongest terms and in writing on behalf of the club by its lawyers.”We believe that publication of the decision in respect of Saracens’ past breaches of the salary cap is an important step towards upholding trust in our enforcement of the regulations and the disciplinary process.”Saracens interim chief executive Edward Griffiths said “a little transparency might help” the situation.”The legality of whether or not the report can be published is a matter for PRL,” he added.”But I think the chairman here has made it clear he would be in favour of the report being published.”Around this issue there has probably been too much intrigue. I think in this day and age it’s probably best to err on the side of transparency.”



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Labour leadership: Long-Bailey says party must sell 'message of aspiration'


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Media captionLabour needs to sell a message of aspiration to voters, says Long-Bailey
Labour had “a great set of policies” at the general election but got its “messaging” wrong, Rebecca Long-Bailey has told the BBC.”We should have been talking about aspiration,” the Labour leadership contender said, but too often talked about “handouts” instead.The party failed to convince voters it believed in “improvement in all of our qualities of life,” she added.The race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn is down to four after Jess Phillips quit.Sir Keir Starmer and Lisa Nandy have made it on the final Labour leadership ballot, after securing the necessary trade union and affiliated group support. Emily Thornberry and Mrs Long-Bailey have yet to reach the threshold.Mr Corbyn announced he would be standing down after Labour suffered its worst defeat, in terms of seats, since 1935 in December’s election. But Mrs Long-Bailey – whose campaign is backed by grassroots organisation Momentum – refused to blame the party’s manifesto, saying she was “proud” of the policies in it.Labour’s “compromise position” on Brexit “didn’t satisfy our communities and meant that we weren’t trusted,” she told the BBC’s political editor, Laura Kuenssberg. And, she added: “We didn’t tackle anti-Semitism and we weren’t trusted to deal with that issue within our own party.”‘Chinese takeaway’ The manifesto policies – which included nationalising utilities and a big increase in tax-funded public spending – were not drawn together into an “overarching narrative” that chimed with the electorate, she said.”Our messaging really didn’t resonate with voters. We should have been talking about aspiration and how all of the things within our manifesto would improve your life, would improve the outcome for businesses in our areas, but we didn’t say that. “Quite often we talked about handouts and how we will help people, rather than providing that broad positive vision of the future.”The shadow business secretary said Labour did not do enough to “sell” her flagship policy, the Green Industrial Revolution, which she said “would have transformed our economy and delivered investment in regions and nations”.

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Media captionRebecca Long-Bailey says she supports gender self-identification
“Whoever becomes leader, we have to reunite the party to make sure that we’re unified in the message that we’re putting forward. But we had many of the right answers to the right questions.”She also hit back at claims she was not forceful enough to be prime minister. “I’m not shy. I mean, I have spent last four years, you know, locked in a room developing many of the policies that we’ve been trying to push forward as a party, but I don’t think you could ever describe me as shy.” She said she could picture herself living in 10 Downing Street, “chilling out” in her pyjamas on a Friday night, with “Netflix and a Chinese takeaway”.Transgender rightsIn a wide-ranging interview, Mrs Long-Bailey was asked whether she had any Conservative friends in Parliament.”Not really, no,” she replied, but added: “I’m friendly to everyone.”She also reiterated her belief that women had a “right to choose” when it came to abortion and she was not in favour of changing the law, after a row over comments she made to Catholic priests during the general election.And she backed a change in the law to allow transgender people to self-identify without the need for medical evidence.Laura Kuenssberg interviewed Sir Keir last week and is aiming to interview Ms Thornberry and Ms Nandy in the coming weeks.



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Alex Salmond sex offences trial to start in March


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Mr Salmond appeared at the High Court in Edinburgh on Wednesday morning

The trial of Alex Salmond, who is accused of carrying out a series of sexual offences against 10 women while serving as Scotland’s first minister, will begin on 9 March.The date was confirmed when Mr Salmond appeared at a procedural hearing at the High Court in Edinburgh on Wednesday.Mr Salmond denies all 14 charges against him, which include one attempted rape and one intent to rape.He is also accused of 10 sexual assaults and two indecent assaults.The offences are alleged to have happened between June 2008 and November 2014. Mr Salmond served as first minister between 16 May 2007 and 20 November 2014.The procedural hearing saw legal arguments being made by Mr Salmond’s lawyers and prosecutors, which cannot be reported for legal reasons. It was confirmed that no further hearings would be held before the trial date.What is Mr Salmond accused of?The charges are set out in an indictment which includes the specific details of the allegations against the 64-year-old former SNP leader.The attempted rape is said to have happened in June 2014 at the first minister’s official Bute House residence in Edinburgh. He is alleged to have pinned a woman against a wall and to have removed her clothes and his own, before pushing her onto a bed and lying naked on top of her.The other 13 charges allege that:
Indecently assaulted a woman on a number of occasions in Glasgow in June and July 2008 by kissing her on the mouth and touching her buttocks and breasts with his hands over her clothing
Sexually assaulted the same woman in December 2010 or December 2011 in the Ego nightclub in Edinburgh by touching her arms and hips with his hands over her clothing
Indecently assaulted a woman in October or November 2010 at Bute House by repeatedly seizing her by the wrists and repeatedly pulling her towards him and attempting to kiss her
Sexually assaulted a woman in a car in Edinburgh in February 2011 by touching her leg with his hand over her clothing
Sexually assaulted a woman on various occasions between 2011 and 2013 at Bute House, the Scottish Parliament and other locations by touching her buttocks with his hands over her clothing, stroking her arms, and touching and stroking her hair
Sexually assaulted a woman at Bute House in October 2013 by removing her foot from her shoe, stroking her foot, lifting her foot towards his mouth and attempting to kiss her foot
Sexually assaulted a woman at Bute House in November or December 2013 by kissing her on the mouth
Intended to rape the same woman in December 2013 at Bute House by causing her to sit on a bed, lying on top of her, making sexual remarks to her, touching her buttocks, thighs and breasts over her clothing with his hands, repeatedly kissing her face, struggling with her and pulling up her dress
Sexually assaulted a woman in 2012 at the Ubiquitous Chip restaurant in Glasgow by touching her buttocks with his hand over her clothing
Sexually assaulted the same woman at Bute House in April 2014 by placing his arm around her, making sexual remarks to her and attempting to kiss her
Sexually assaulted a woman at Bute House in May 2014 by placing his arm around her body, placing his hand under her clothing and underwear and touching her breast, repeatedly kissing her on the face and neck and stroking her leg with his hand
Sexually assaulted a woman at Bute House in September 2014 by seizing her by the shoulders, repeatedly kissing her on the face, attempting to kiss her on the lips and touching her leg and face with his hand
Sexually assaulted a woman at Stirling Castle in November 2014 by touching her buttock with his hand over her clothing
Alex Salmond’s political career

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Reuters

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Mr Salmond was twice leader of the SNP, but quit the party in 2018 after taking legal action against the government

He was twice leader of the SNP, and led the party into government at Holyrood in 2007
Mr Salmond left office after the 2014 Scottish independence referendum, with his former deputy Nicola Sturgeon taking his place in Bute House
He returned to Westminster as an MP the following year, but lost his Gordon seat in the snap election in 2017
Mr Salmond has since worked as a talk show host on Russian network RT
He quit the SNP when launching his legal action against the Scottish government in 2018



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Six Nations build-up 'different' after Saracens punishment – Farrell




Owen Farrell has played 188 times for SaracensEngland and Saracens fly-half Owen Farrell is hoping the Six Nations will provide an escape after a “different” build-up to the annual tournament.Saracens will be relegated from the Premiership at the end of the season following salary cap breaches.Eddie Jones’ England gather for the first time on Wednesday ahead of their opener against France on 2 February.”It’s been different over the last couple of days,” said Farrell, one of seven Sarries in the 34-man squad.England begin a seven-day training camp in Portugal on Thursday before their Six Nations opener in Paris.Talking on BBC Radio 5 Live’s Rugby Union Weekly podcast, England captain Farrell added: “We’ve had chats individually for the lads that are going away. Nothing’s set in stone yet so I’m not going to go into it. “That has given us enough clarity that we’re excited about what’s in front of us which is the most important thing.”Farrell, 28, made his senior debut for Saracens in 2008 and has played 188 times for the side.The Rugby Football Union confirmed that players can be picked for England from the Championship but there has been much speculation about whether Farrell will stick with Sarries when they are relegated.The fly-half says “there’s an idea” of what he is going to do, but added: “There’s a fair few moving parts to it so nothing is set in stone.”Farrell turns focus to England and Six NationsEngland head coach Jones said the side would hold talks to resolve any anger among the squad relating to Saracens.And Farrell insists he is “clear enough” on his club future to “crack on and enjoy” being with the international team.”It’s always brilliant to see the lads again then get going, see where we can take this,” he said.”For me it’s unbelievably exciting and I’m sure it is for the rest of the lads so we’ll get together and see where we’re at.”We’ve got a bit of an idea about our own situations but you’re stepping away from the club where there’s a lot of different ones going on.”‘Disappointing’ World Cup will be discussedEngland assemble at their Bagshot base on Wednesday for the first time since losing the World Cup final to South Africa in November.Jones has selected 22 players from the World Cup squad for the Six Nations, as well as eight uncapped players.Farrell says the “disappointing” result in Japan will also be a subject of discussion when the squad gets together.”What’s happened since [the World Cup], everybody will be in a different situation and that’s what we’ll have a chat about when we’re all together,” he explained.”We’ll get it all out in the open and get it sorted so that we can crack on with the rugby.”It’s only every four years that you get together for that amount of time. This group grew a lot over that time.”I don’t think we can assume that tightness is going to stay the way it is. We’ve got to make sure we work at it and push on with it.”



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Labour leadership: Nandy joins Starmer on final ballot


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Media captionLisa Nandy: ‘No support’ for those on Universal Credit
Lisa Nandy is the second Labour leadership hopeful to get onto the final ballot, after Chinese for Labour announced it was supporting her.The Wigan MP joins shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer, having already got backing from the GMB union and the National Union of Mineworkers.To progress, hopefuls need the support of three unions and affiliate groups representing 5% of the membership.Emily Thornberry and Rebecca Long-Bailey are yet to reach the threshold.Jess Phillips quit the race to replace Jeremy Corbyn on Tuesday.Ms Phillips told reporters she would be giving her first preference vote to Ms Nandy, with Sir Keir her second choice. She said shadow business secretary Mrs Long-Bailey was not the right leader for Labour at the moment, but “there’s no reason to say she can’t change.” Chairwoman of Chinese for Labour – a group affiliated to the Labour Party – and Luton North MP Sarah Owen said: “Only in power can Labour make the radical changes that are so desperately needed for our towns and communities.”We believe that Lisa is the right candidate to take us there.”Chinese for Labour aims to promote the interests of British Chinese and East Asian people in the Labour Party.Reacting to the endorsement, Ms Nandy said: “As someone of mixed heritage, I’m incredibly proud that it is Chinese for Labour who have secured my place on the ballot paper.”They do incredibly important work to ensure we are a representative and inclusive party that can truly speak for modern Britain.”She said she was now “looking forward to getting out into the country and laying out my vision for reuniting the party”.Labour ‘paternalistic’Earlier in a speech, Ms Nandy said she would give claimants a bigger role in designing an “empowering” welfare system. The current system lacked “human empathy” and was too complicated for people to understand, she said, promising to reverse cuts by ditching planned reductions in national insurance.

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Media captionFour candidates remain in the race for the Labour leadership
Speaking ahead of her speech on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Ms Nandy said changes to the welfare system had been undermined by the “values which permeate the system”. The regime has tended to “see people as problems to be solved, not potential to be realised”, she said, and urged the Labour Party to ditch a “paternalistic” attitude on the issue.In its election manifesto, Labour had argued for the universal credit scheme to be scrapped and replaced with an alternative that “treats people with dignity and respect”. Ms Nandy added that she supported the “principle” behind universal credit – to simplify the regime and encourage people into work – but “no support at all” had been offered to those being rolled onto it.

Mr Corbyn’s successor – and the successor to his deputy, Tom Watson – will be announced on 4 April.With Sir Keir’s and Ms Nandy’s places on the ballot secured, the two other candidates are locked in a battle to join him by securing support from local parties and affiliated groups. Sir Keir cleared this hurdle after being backed by Unison – the UK’s largest union – and a second union, Usdaw, as well as environmental campaign group Sera.Ms Long-Bailey has so far only received the backing of bakers’ union the BFAWU, but is tipped to get nominated by the Unite union later this week. So far Ms Thornberry has not been backed by any affiliate group, and had only secured two out of the required 33 CLPs which would help her onto the ballot. Watson’s replacementIn the contest to find Labour’s new deputy leader, only shadow education secretary Angela Rayner has received the required support so far.She faces competition for the role from Scotland’s only remaining Labour MP, Ian Murray, shadow equalities minister Dawn Butler, Tooting MP Rosena Allin-Khan and shadow justice secretary Richard Burgon.Ms Rayner has been backed by the GMB union, NUM, Unison and Usdaw, while the BFAWU is supporting Mr Burgon.Ms Phillips has endorsed Mr Murray, saying he has put forward “a positive vision not only for our party, but also for the country”.”He recognises that we can’t just talk to ourselves – we must listen to voters in seats we held, seats we lost and seats we have never held,” she said



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Terry Jones: Monty Python star dies aged 77


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Monty Python star Terry Jones has died at the age of 77, his agent has said.A statement from his family said: “We are deeply saddened to have to announce the passing of beloved husband and father, Terry Jones.”Terry passed away on the evening of 21 January 2020 at the age of 77 with his wife Anna Soderstrom by his side after a long, extremely brave but always good humoured battle with a rare form of dementia, FTD.”Over the past few days his wife, children, extended family and many close friends have been constantly with Terry as he gently slipped away at his home in north London. We have all lost a kind, funny, warm, creative and truly loving man whose uncompromising individuality, relentless intellect and extraordinary humour has given pleasure to countless millions across six decades.Remembering Terry Jones: Master of the absurd”His work with Monty Python, his books, films, television programmes, poems and other work will live on forever, a fitting legacy to a true polymath.”We, his wife Anna, children Bill, Sally, Siri and extended family would like to thank Terry’s wonderful medical professionals and carers for making the past few years not only bearable but often joyful.”We hope that this disease will one day be eradicated entirely. We ask that our privacy be respected at this sensitive time and give thanks that we lived in the presence of an extraordinarily talented, playful and happy man living a truly authentic life, in his words ‘Lovingly frosted with glucose.'”



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Jeff Bezos hack: Saudi Arabia calls claim ‘absurd’


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The relationship between Jeff Bezos and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman soured after Jamal Khashoggi’s murder

Saudi Arabia has denied that its crown prince was responsible for hacking Amazon boss Jeff Bezos’ phone.A message from a phone number used by the prince has been implicated in the data breach, according to reports.The kingdom’s US embassy said the stories were “absurd” and called for an investigation into them.Relations between Saudi Arabia and Mr Bezos – who owns the Washington Post – worsened after one of the newspaper’s staff was killed in a Saudi consulate.Jamal Khashoggi, a prominent critic of the Saudi government, was murdered in Istanbul months after this alleged cyber-attack took place.
Saudis sentence five over Khashoggi murder
How Saudi Arabia’s crown prince rose to power
Mr Bezos’ phone was hacked after receiving a WhatsApp message in May 2018 that was sent from Mohammed bin Salman’s personal account, according to the Guardian newspaper which broke the story.An investigation into the data breach reportedly found that the billionaire’s phone had started secretly sharing huge amounts of data after he received an encrypted video file from the prince.The Twitter account of the kingdom’s US embassy issued an outright denial of the claims.

Skip Twitter post by @SaudiEmbassyUSA

Recent media reports that suggest the Kingdom is behind a hacking of Mr. Jeff Bezos’ phone are absurd. We call for an investigation on these claims so that we can have all the facts out.— Saudi Embassy (@SaudiEmbassyUSA) January 22, 2020

End of Twitter post by @SaudiEmbassyUSA

Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment from the BBC.The allegations are based on a report that was commissioned by the private security firm FTI Consulting, which was hired by Mr Bezos. Two UN officials are expected to make a statement about the credibility of the allegations later on Wednesday.

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Hacking ‘horribly easy to do’Analysis by Jane Wakefield, BBC News technology reporterWhile the details of how this happened aren’t yet public, evidence is pointing towards a WhatsApp conversation between the two men during which an infected video file was allegedly sent.It is unclear what the content of that video was, but there is huge interest in finding out what a crown prince might send to one of the world’s most powerful tech leaders.Such a hack is “horribly easy to do”, says computer expert Professor Alan Woodward. The seemingly innocent video would have contained malware that surreptitiously installed itself on the targeted phone.From there it would have been possible for the hacker to gain access to all the functions of the phone, from the GPS locator, to the camera, to the banking facilities and messaging apps.Such access is made possible via bugs in the code and, last year, a security flaw in WhatsApp was revealed that would have allowed hackers to hide malicious code inside video files. Phone hacking is, says Prof Woodward, all too common in certain countries that are keen to keep an eye on journalists, dissidents and other activists perceived to be a threat to their regimes. So-called stalkerware is available off the shelf to these governments.But what about the involvement of the Saudi crown prince? Was it really him who installed the malware? It is unlikely that he set the phone up himself. So was his phone also being spied on? Or was he simply a vessel being used by the Saudi authorities?The plot thickens.

The reports come after private information about Mr Bezos was leaked to the American tabloid the National Enquirer.In February 2019 Mr Bezos accused the National Enquirer of “extortion and blackmail” after it published text messages between him and his girlfriend, former Fox television presenter Lauren Sánchez.A month earlier he and MacKenzie Bezos, his wife of 25 years, had announced that they planned to divorce having been separated for a “long period”.An investigator for the Amazon founder later said Saudi Arabia was behind the National Enquirer leak and had accessed his data.”Our investigators and several experts concluded with high confidence that the Saudis had access to Bezos’ phone, and gained private information,” Gavin de Becker wrote on the Daily Beast website at the time.Mr de Becker linked the hack to the Washington Post’s coverage of the murder of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.



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Does a milk advert show Harry and Meghan's future?


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The Queen’s grandson Peter Phillips is shown endorsing Jersey milk in a series of adverts in China

It evokes a quintessentially English image of lush green fields and grand stately homes and ends with the Queen’s grandson taking a satisfying sip of fresh milk.A Chinese television advertisement, unearthed by the Daily Mail this week, shows Princess Anne’s son, Peter Phillips, endorsing milk from Jersey cows and comes as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex prepare for a new life of greater financial independence.Despite not having a royal title and never having been a working royal, Mr Phillips, 42, is introduced to viewers as a “British Royal Family member” while he is pictured in various regal settings in the campaign, which aired on Shanghai television. At one point he says of the milk, via a Chinese voiceover translated by BBC Monitoring: “It’s fresh, and it’s what I want”.The Mail revealed on Wednesday that another of Prince Harry’s cousins, Lady Kitty Spencer, 29, has also worked with a separate Chinese milk brand on a campaign partly filmed at the British Museum.It raises the question of whether Prince Harry and Meghan might pursue similar work as they take more control over their finances.For royal biographer Penny Junor, the sight of a person with royal connections using their status for financial gain “always looks bad”.”It does not reflect well on the monarchy,” she told the BBC – though she adds there is an attraction to such deals. “It is difficult,” she said. “I understand the need to feed a family.”

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Peter Phillips and his wife Autumn Kelly sold pictures of their 2008 wedding at Windsor to Hello! magazine

Royal observers said that, in reality, there is little to stop those born into the ancestral Royal Family – but who have not taken official working royal roles – from pursuing commercial opportunities.”Peter Phillips was absolutely entitled to do what he likes because he is not a member of the Royal Family,” royal commentator Ingrid Seward told the BBC’s PM programme.”He is by blood but he doesn’t ever represent the Queen, he doesn’t represent the Crown, he has never taken public funds and he doesn’t do any royal duties and therefore he can do what he likes.”While this may be the case, Buckingham Palace suggests on its website that the use of Royal Family members – including Peter Phillips – for commercial purposes should be approved beforehand.

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Getty Images

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Lady Kitty Spencer has also appeared in a Chinese milk campaign – although she is not a member of the Royal Family by blood, she is Prince Harry’s cousin

Former Home Office minister Norman Baker said strict rules governing royal endorsements have been broken and has written to the Cabinet Secretary Sir Mark Sedwill to express his concern. In the letter, seen by the BBC, Mr Baker wrote: “The word ‘royal’ is of course strictly controlled by the royal names team in the Cabinet Office. “Can I ask whether permission was sought and given for the use of the word ‘royal’ to sell milk? Assuming it was not, what steps do you and your colleagues intend to take to end this use immediately?”A Cabinet Office source said the matter was not one for the department.’Uphold Queen’s values”In a statement from Buckingham Palace last week, Prince Harry and Meghan are described as making clear “everything they do will continue to uphold the values of Her Majesty”.And a palace source told the Times: “The values we usually talk about are the Nolan principles of public life. But obviously the view was taken within the family that those sorts of things will be discussed”.The Royal Household said in its latest annual report that it endorses the so-called Nolan principles of public life when it comes to the declaration of interests and that it is “active in maintaining high standards of conduct in relation to its employees and officials”.The seven principles were first set out by the late Lord Nolan in 1995 and are included in the Ministerial code for elected officials.

What are the Nolan principles of public life?
Selflessness
Integrity
Objectivity
Accountability
Openness
Honesty
Leadership
Source: Gov.uk

Those who are royal by blood rather than by title – as the Sussexes will soon be – are unlikely to have to seek permission from Buckingham Palace before endorsing products or appearing in advertisements, according to Ingrid Seward.”I think they have to be sensible and maybe ask advice,” she added. “It is a very difficult tightrope to walk and basically you have to run everything you want to do by a committee of people.”Yet Penny Junor said that approach might not work for Prince Harry and Meghan – who are set to gain as much freedom as Peter Phillips by setting aside their official royal status later this year.Meghan has already secured work with entertainment giant Disney in return for a donation to an elephant conservation charity, while Harry’s sports’ links could be attractive to potential sponsors.

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Meghan’s acting skills could see her secure further work for entertainment companies like Disney

“With Harry and Meghan, everyone knows who they are. They do not need their royal titles to make money,” Ms Junor said.”The spirit of the agreement seems to be that they won’t use their royal status for financial gain.”But I’m not sure their American advisors are in tune with the subtleties of the British Royal Family.”The couple have also placed an application to trademark their Sussex Royal moniker, covering merchandise including books, clothing and calendars. In his letter to the cabinet secretary, Norman Baker asked what guidance was sought prior to the Sussexes’ application.Buckingham Palace said it does not speak on behalf of Mr Phillips and did not respond to the BBC’s broader questions about protocols and procedures regarding commercial deals.



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